Technical Information/Support RequestsNvidia hit with false advertising suit over GTX 970

Just as the title says

Moderator: Members

User avatar

Topic author
Cybex
Member
Posts: 3435
Joined: April 2008
Contact:
Status: Offline

Sat Feb 21, 2015 1:17 pm

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2887234/nvidia-hit-with-false-advertising-suit-over-gtx-970-performance.html#tk.nl_today

Gaming enthusiasts have been griping for months that Nvidia's GeForce GTX 970 graphics chip doesn't operate up to snuff, and now someone has taken the company to court over it.

Nvidia was hit with a class action lawsuit Thursday that claims it misled customers about the capabilities of the GTX 970, which was released in September.

Nvidia markets the chip as having 4GB of performance-boosting video RAM, but some users have complained the chip falters after using 3.5GB of that allocation.

The lawsuit says the remaining half gigabyte runs 80 percent slower than it's supposed to. That can cause images to stutter on a high resolution screen and some games to perform poorly, the suit says.

It was filed in the U.S. District Court for Northern California and names as defendants Nvidia and Giga-Byte Technology, which sells the GTX 970 in graphics cards.

Nvidia declined to comment on the lawsuit Friday and Giga-Byte couldn't immediately be reached.

Responding to the issue last month, Nvidia acknowledged that the GTX 970 uses a different memory subsystem design than its higher-end GTX 980, but it said that difference has a negligible impact on performance.

It has also said that, due to an error, the original specifications it published for the GTX 970 were incorrect.

Some gamers are unhappy and want their money back. A discussion thread about the topic at the GeForce.com website runs for 360 pages. There's also a petition at Change.org with more than 8,000 signatures asking regulators in Europe and the U.S. to force Nvidia to provide refunds.

Thursday's lawsuit seeks a jury trial and whatever damages apply under California law. It was filed on behalf of all consumers in the U.S. who bought graphics or video cards with the GTX 970. It will be up to the judge to decide whether the lawsuit can proceed as a class action.
LAND OF THE FREE BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE

User avatar

KungfuBeer
Member
Posts: 15173
Joined: November 2006
Contact:
Status: Offline

Sat Feb 21, 2015 2:40 pm

Nice
Image

User avatar

sidewinder9x
Member
Posts: 6303
Joined: April 2008
Contact:
Status: Offline

Sat Feb 21, 2015 3:52 pm

Do I see an "upgrade" coming?

User avatar

Topic author
Cybex
Member
Posts: 3435
Joined: April 2008
Contact:
Status: Offline

Fri Jul 29, 2016 8:05 am

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3101741/ ... tk.rss_all

Jul 29, 2016 7:06 AM
A set of class action lawsuits relating to the controversy around Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 970 graphics card may be resolved soon.

A court filing from Monday shows a proposed settlement that would see GTX 970 owners reimbursed $30 per card. The settlement would also see the defendants—listed as Nvidia, Gigabyte, Asus, and EVGA—pay out $1.3 million in attorneys’ fees.

The court will hear the petition to approve the settlement on Wednesday, August 24, as first reported by Top Class Actions. A total of 15 lawsuits seeking class-action status would be settled if the proposal goes through.

PCWorld tried to reach Nvidia for comment early Thursday afternoon. At this writing the company had not yet responded.
The GTX 970 woes

After the GTX 970 rolled out in September 2014, gamers started to notice that the card's performance would suffer when it used more than 3.5GB of the card’s 4GB of VRAM.

Nvidia later admitted that the design of the card was to blame, which split the card’s memory into 3.5GB and 512MB segments. Nvidia’s CEO later explained that the memory segmentation was an inventive way to make the GTX 970 a 4GB card when it normally would’ve been 3GB.

At the same time of the memory fallout, Nvidia also divulged that the card had 56 render output units as opposed to the originally stated 64 ROPs.

Some online retailers offered refunds to irked customers as a result of the memory and ROP discrepancies, and the first lawsuit over the issue was filed in February 2015. The lawsuits largely claimed that Nvidia misled its customers. Nvidia denied those allegations. The proposed settlement would not force the company admit to any liability. The Register has a copy of the proposed settlement if you want to take a look.

At the time of the controversy, we said the GTX 970 still delivered great performance for the price. Knowing those key details about the graphics card's capabilities makes it easier for buyers to understand its potential strengths and weaknesses. For example, the reduced frame buffer makes the GTX 970 less appealing for people looking to use two graphics cards in one PC to drive a 4K monitor. That said, the GTX 970 has since been overshadowed by newer graphics cards that offer higher performance at equal or better prices.

The impact on you at home: Speaking of prices, GTX 970 owners will want to pay attention to court proceedings next month. Soon you may be able to get a $30 rebate on your card. In fact, if you bought your card from Amazon, you might even be able to get a refund right now. Users on Reddit’s PC forums are reporting that the online retailer is still offering a 20 percent refund on at least some GTX 970 purchases, similar to what it offered users in February 2015.
LAND OF THE FREE BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE

User avatar

KungfuBeer
Member
Posts: 15173
Joined: November 2006
Contact:
Status: Offline

Fri Jul 29, 2016 8:54 am

This just means the cost of all NVidia cards will go up. Too bad they lied and too bad the customer "got screwed" but really too bad that we end up getting screwed twice..

We pay for the rebate ourselves in the end. Most people fail to realize that.
Image

User avatar

Bojac
Member
Posts: 481
Joined: December 2014
Contact:
Status: Offline

Fri Jul 29, 2016 12:51 pm

LOL, the GTX 1080 just went up $30.00
"If anyone loves the world, love for the Father is not in them. For everything in the world—the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life—comes not from the Father but from the world." 1 John 2:15-16

User avatar

KungfuBeer
Member
Posts: 15173
Joined: November 2006
Contact:
Status: Offline

Fri Jul 29, 2016 1:03 pm

Bojac wrote:LOL, the GTX 1080 just went up $30.00
:rofl: :cry:
Image

User avatar

Topic author
Cybex
Member
Posts: 3435
Joined: April 2008
Contact:
Status: Offline

Mon Sep 12, 2016 2:14 pm

Nvidia’s paying the price for the GeForce GTX 970’s memory controversy—literally. The GTX 970 refund website https://www.gtx970settlement.com/Home.aspx is now live after Nvidia agreed to pay GTX 970 owners $30 each to settle a class action lawsuit.

The false advertising lawsuit stemmed from a pair of hardware inconsistencies that prompted a not-quite-apology from Nvidia’s CEO. The most obvious is the GeForce GTX 970’s notorious 4GB RAM allotment, which Nvidia split into a full-speed 3.5GB segment as well as a drastically slower 512MB segment without telling customers. The company also erroneously claimed the card had 64 render output units while in reality it had just 56.

Both of those could affect performance—though the GTX 970 was still a kick-ass graphics card with an incredibly compelling price tag. That combo led to the GTX 970 being dubbed the people’s champion, and it’s far and away the most popular card with Steam users. Now all those users are eligible for a $30 settlement, which makes the GTX 970 seem like an even better buy in retrospect.

Well, some of those users. You’re eligible only if you purchased a GeForce GTX 970 graphics card from Nvidia, its add-in card partners (like EVGA and Asus), or an authorized retailer between September 1, 2014 and August 24, 2016, and only in the U.S. You might also be eligible if you purchased a desktop computer with a GTX 970 from an authorized retailer in that time frame.

Don’t dilly-dally if you’re eligible. You must file a claim by November 8 if you plan on cashing in. The court is expected to approve the settlement in December.

The impact on you at home: As always, you’ll need to prove that you actually bought a GTX 970 before Nvidia sends you a check. You can do so in the usual ways—with a receipt, a credit card statement, a purchase order, etc—but the settlement also supports an easier verification method: Your device ID. Between that and the ability to file a claim online, you could register for a refund in no time.

To find your GTX 970’s device ID, simply fire up the Nvidia Control Panel, click System Information in the lower-left corner, and look for the Device ID listing in the default Display tab. It should be the second from the bottom.
http://www.pcworld.com/article/3118700/ ... _tech_html
I already submitted mine :bigsmile:
LAND OF THE FREE BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE

User avatar

KungfuBeer
Member
Posts: 15173
Joined: November 2006
Contact:
Status: Offline

Mon Sep 12, 2016 3:14 pm

I just did too
Image

User avatar

R2Namru9
Posts: 560
Joined: October 2007
Contact:
Status: Offline

Tue Sep 13, 2016 7:27 am

And done.
Image

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Information
  • Who is online

    Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest